"The world would be a sad place without progress if we didn’t try to change the injustice we see and feel." - Hana Dubova


Under the title, Follow My Footprints, Rachael brings this story into a diverse group of communities, adjusting the focus of her presentations and workshops to speak to the age and interest of the audience. 

For teen and young adult classes, workshops can be molded to aid students in better understanding the refugee crisis and to build empathy for immigrants assimilating into present-day America. Contemporary chapters of this work paired with historical context are an important opportunity to have challenging conversation in a safe space.

For adult education, Rachael often focuses on the personal journey she took following in her grandmother’s footprints, the lessons of how trauma and resilience are passed down from generation to generation. 

The project addresses the fragility of democracy and highlights ordinary people who have taken extraordinary risk in times of uncertainty; it aims to inspire a consciousness of how our own narratives are interwoven with those of our neighbors.


Speaking engagements and classes during the past few years include:

2017 Congregation Dorshei Tzedek / Adult Education & Teen Program (MA)

2017 Temple Israel of Boston / Teen Program (MA)

2016/2017 Hadassah / Adult Education (PA, MA)

2016/2017 Temple Isaiah of Lexington / Teen Program (MA)

2016/2017 Temple Sinai of Brookline / Adult Education & Teen Program (MA)

2016 Gratz College / Tuzman Holocaust-Teach In (PA)

2015/2016 Moore College of Art / University Presentation (PA)

2016 Kutz Camp / Week-long Teen Program (NY)


My father always banged into our heads to LEARN, LEARN, as they can take everything away from you, but not what you have in your head.
— Hana Dubova
Hana in school in Prague in 1931. Before fleeing Czechoslovakia she had attended both a German-speaking school as well as a French-speaking school making her trilingual by the time she became a teenager.

Hana in school in Prague in 1931. Before fleeing Czechoslovakia she had attended both a German-speaking school as well as a French-speaking school making her trilingual by the time she became a teenager.